Pingponged Intensity

A pigeon ran into my leg today.

And I have accumulated 3 good bus stories since my arrival in Wellington.

1. If you and another teen sprint past a bus through the outskirts of the capital while looking amused and panicked at the prospect of walking 45 minutes, the bus driver will wait a split second longer for you as you come puffing up to the next stop.

2. If a look of extreme panic passes over your companion’s face when she sees a bus coming and you can’t make it to the next stop, the driver will stop for you just before he is supposed to, (provided you are the only people about to be on the service).

3. “You know this bus doesn’t depart for another 10 minutes right?” Yes. But it’s warmer in here than out there. “Fair enough.” The following conversation was genuine, kind, and was a good solidifying reminder to talk to bus drivers. There is a high chance they are bored out of their minds.

I also developed a way to deal with my body’s fear of turbulence on my way from Queenstown to Wellington. Close my eyes, breath deeply, listen to Eminem. (Worked better than anything else I’ve tried so far.)

The city is a good place to think. Most people seem to be preoccupied by this activity, or at least the act of trying not to do it, here in concrete worshipping centers of population. It is also a good place to nurse depression into a worse state of being. No wonder everyone is so damned pessimistic about everything. My most cynical theories develop in direct correlation to how many people I’m around apparently.

But at the same time. I love it. I love how many stories there are. How much potential for creativity and niches. How I am reminded of my futility and possibilities. How I am no different from anyone else.

No matter what my ego tries to whisper in my ear.

I also happily pingponged my way through the museum today. The interactive bits are the best. (Like when they let you play with shadows.) OR when they dedicated a giant space to playing with colored light. If I don’t balance ridiculous amounts of cynicism with ridiculous amounts of happiness, I shall be crushed.

Sometimes I wonder if there are less intense ways to live. Probably. But they usually sound much less fun.

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Putting the I in Write

Why do I write?

I’m in the process of considering this question and I came upon a piece of the answer today.

It’s a less obtrusive photography.

I can pull out my notebook and highlight what I want to remember about you. The pieces that stand out. The funny thing you said. But my camera may just make you uncomfortable.

I stood in The Spice Room kitchen trying to photograph what I could with the gentle shutter clicks. Still it felt…off. Maybe their stories didn’t need photographic evidence or maybe I just told myself that so I didn’t have to admit how little I know about my craft.

But with a pencil, it is not immediately known that I have seen. Omit a name and it was never about you. Rearrange a few words and suddenly the world gets what I wanted them to notice.

With words I can show you that pureed spinach actually looks closer to an emerald or the jungle than it does vomit. I can note the scars of chefs who have burnt and cut and created until their bodies subtly reflected the lives they lead. I can tell you that some of my favorite smiles come from these men who sing to themselves and say “the curries will miss you.”

I write because it’s how I think.

I write because we are saturated with images.

I write because this way, you see what I see.

And sometimes my occasionally egocentric self just prefers it that way.

(also I’m constantly in awe and it’s nice to share that)

You F***ing Idiot

The amount of times I have almost been run over in Wanaka is too many to count.

To be fair. Most of them were my fault.

Some of it comes from a “I can totally make it if this person doesn’t think I’m an idiot” type attitude. Others are from a “sprint! If I was in Asia, it would be fine!” kind of outlook.

And most of them usually happen while I’m longboarding.

“Do you wear a helmet?”…no…

I remember watching skaters go by and thinking “show offs” or “I wish I could do that.” Since I taught myself to not easily be killed by a plank of wood on wheels, I have found I am in the loop.

Skaters are totally showing off.

Because they can. No breaks. Speed. The ability to swerve through people and traffic. Stunts. Hell, just the knowledge of how to stand on one comfortably endows the rider a confidence that they definitely know the world can see.

And it is not that hard to learn.

Believe it or not, I am far less afraid on a longboard than I am a bike. I am far less afraid careening down a hill than behind the wheel of a car. I am far less afraid of the prospect of falling off than I am of tweaking my back injury some other way.

I’m not sure why. I have less control. I have a high chance of injury. I often find myself distracted by the stars overhead or the mountains beside. It is the characteristic stupidity of the young.

I guess maybe I’m just showing off.

…then damn, I look cool.

In Other News, I Bought a Mandolin

My eyelids dragged shut, my legs creaked at me, and my brain simply drifted back into the fog of sleep as I regained consciousness this morning. Waking up was a slow process and I found myself starting to slip into some odd sort of funk. “I should be doing something. Maybe I should go on a hike since the weather is nice. Perhaps I am silly for not starting on something sooner.”

Finally I shook my head of the silliness and reminded myself I walked really freaking far yesterday. I trailblazed to a crater very few people see and managed to be back on time to do a shift as receptionist.

“Just get yourself out of bed, Abiel. You can do this.”

I was able to make a good breakfast and go on an outing with two lovely friends. “When in doubt, go out” is some of the best advice I received before I left. Today it proved true.

Come afternoon, I wandered to the tiny house of one of my favorite people.

“Hey! Look what I got! A mandolin. It was only $50 and it’s helping me figure out the violin too.”

I fell in love with the little instrument he showed me. It’s deep, dreamlike color, uneven brush strokes, pearly silver pegs, and the elegant hardware.

“A year from now, we’ll all be gone,
All our friends will move away.
And they’re going to better places,
But our friends will be gone away.”

My heart nearly skipped a beat with happiness as he began to sing “Rivers and Roads” by The Head and the Heart. The little mandolin rang and I let my voice join their song.

For the next hour or so, I plopped on the carpet and learned chords until my fingers were indented by the strings.

“So what would you suggest I look for if I were to buy my own mandolin?”

“Well. You know what?…one second.” I watched as he scrolled through his phone for a moment. “So I would ultimately like a mandolin that I can plug into an amp and I have a bid on one right now. If you like, you can buy that one off me.”

Holy shit. Really?!

So uh. I am now traveling with a mandolin.

And I could not be happier about it.

I’m working on learning to play “Rivers and Roads” and “What Do You Do with a Drunken Sailor” because what’s life without variety?

Thankfully I was taught the latter song and told to wing the strumming pattern for the former. (“It gives it more soul.”)

Multiple hours later, I was still curled up with my new instrument and my friend had made a rack for all of his other instruments.

Oh. He plays the didgeridoo. Coolest freaking instrument ever and it sounds otherworldly beautiful.

“By the time I get to America, you can come with me and we’ll go play our mandolins at some music sessions.”

That’ll be f*cking awesome.